FLOW.13 Artists

The Projects

Transcendence is Absorption

To install Transcendence is Absorption, Dodes will build a conventional billboard structure with a viewing station on its backside as a poetic, puzzling and propagandistic intervention in the public park of Randall's Island.

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Loquacious

Guzmán’s Loquacious is proposed as a 13’x4’ roughly pentagonal mirrored structure along the shoreline of Randall’s Island Park.

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Looping Back

Otitigbe’s Looping Back will represent the shape of jazz and the aesthetics of improvisation, as inspired by the Carnival of Swing held on Randall’s Island Park in 1938.

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New Growth

For New Growth, Percoco will integrate eight images of trees from local yellow pages advertisements into the real landscape on Randall’s Island Park.

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View

To create View, Wightman will construct a steel bench that frames both the human industry of the Manhattan skyline and the microbial industry of Randall’s Island Park’s Little Hell Gate Inlet salt marsh.

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The Blog

New color composition

Just as the trees are changing colors, so is View. 

 

Looping Back Final Images

Here are some images of the final piece.  I would like to thank Uchenna Itam, Ben Weisgall, Stephan Williams, Stefan Keneas, and DJ ZUKO! for all their help and support through the entire design, fabrication, and installation process.  I could not have pulled this off without you.  One of these images made it into Rush Arts Gallery as part of Curate NYC 2013.

Photography by Eddy Vallante

Looping Back Build Process

LOOPING BACK’s final design consisted of twenty-one separate units.  Each one having a plywood “substructure” that provided structural integrity.  All of these substructures were “skinned” with poplar bark shingles.  Fourteen units, which were identical in design, made up the smaller sections of the overall structure. Each of the remaining seven units had a unique structural design.  

I initially I developed LOOPING BACK’s using two CAD software applications Solidworks and Rhino. These two applications made it easy for me to fabricate the fourteen identical sections.  However as I went on to construct the remaining sections, which were larger and more complex in design, I could no longer rely on software or even simple measuring devices like rulers.  I had to create each of these sections by hand and eye, relying solely the experience I gained from making the smaller sections.  At this point the only other tools I could use to were a band saw, hand-held electric drill, and an angle-finder.  This process of using simple tools to achieve complex forms is typically employed by boat builders.  I view this type creative process as a form of improvisation.  I gained a certain degree of mastery over the materials and form while making the smaller repeated sections.  Then I was able to abandon the repeated structures in favor of a composition that was varied and more complex.

Bacteria star in Lincoln Center NY Film Festival!

If they could, I bet the bacteria on Randall's Island would like to watch their peers splash on the Big Screen of Lincoln Center this weekend!  As part of Views from the Avant Garde the microbes from my Gowanus Canal living colorfield are featured in an elegant short by filmmaker Sarah J Christman.  While you can't view her film online, my documentation of the Gowanus mud samples over 3 months can be watched on vimeo.

orange reds yellows pinks greens

 Manhattan skyline reflected.

The Artists

Stephanie DodesStephanie Dodes

Stephanie Dodes creates mass media driven psychological installations comprising video, collage, performance and sculptural elements.

Alejandro GuzmanAlejandro Guzman

Guzmán focuses his artistic practice on the idea of creative misunderstandings through art.

Eto OtitigbeEto Otitigbe

Eto Otitigbe is polymedia artist whose practice includes sculpture, performance, and installation to investigate issues of race, technology, politics, and human interaction.

Anne PercocoAnne Percoco

Anne Percoco makes art not by creating something new, but by reorganizing what’s already there.

Jenifer WightmanJenifer Wightman

Jenifer Wightman's work employs scientific tropes to incite curiosity about ecological phenomena.